Moulin-à-Vent

 

This is the only winegrowing sector that has not been given the name of a village. The most prestigious appellation of the Beaujolais region, it stretches across 2 villages: Romanèche-Thorins and Chénas.

The eponymous windmill has existed for 450 years. The activity of milling grain ended in 1850. The windmill is now listed as an Historical Monument.

The soil possesses an exceptional character found in the wines, particularly in Romanèche-Thorins: it is comprised of manganese, in the past a type of rock people called “glassmaker’s soap”, because it served to whiten glass used by pottery works.

 

*

Moulin-à-Vent

Vignes du Tremblay

Delicacy and purity

 

This wine marks the origin of the domain. My grandfather purchased his first plots of vines in 1937, situated in the locality named Le Tremblay. Nowadays, this wine is a blend from several localities named Les Greneriers, Les Burdelines, Les Pérelles, Champs de Cour, Les Brussellions and Aux Caves.

 

• 100% Gamay Noir with clear juice; yields of 25 to 35 hectolitres per hectare, depending on each vintage.

• Very worn granite soils, piedmont and ancient alluvium.

• In majority, the vines are 40 to 70 years old, pruned traditionally in the low-trained Gobelet style.

• The other plots, vines aged 25 years, are pruned in the short Double-Cordon style.

• The soil is worked, with ploughing done 3 to 4 times a year.

• Harvests are picked by hand, using small crates which can hold up to 35 kilos. Sorting is done on a vibrating sorting table. Winemaking, using whole bunches, is done keeping each plot in a separate vat for a period of 12 to 15 days before pressing.

• Wine from each plot is matured in separate vats for a period of 10 months on fine lees, with micro-oxygenation.

• Blending is done prior to bottling.

 

Download the data sheet

*

Moulin-à-Vent

Les Greneriers

Strength and intensity

 

We have 3 plots in this named-locality. The largest covers 1.1 hectares and my father bought it in 1967, with vines here planted before 1914. We also have 2 small plots of 0.55 and 0.32 hectares. The name “Les Greneriers” certainly stems from the French word “graines”(meaning grain), because in the past cereals were planted here in place of vines. It is for good reason that the appellation is named “Moulin-à-Vent”, since the windmill stood here to grind the grain.

 

• 100% Gamay Noir with clear juice; yields of 20 to 30 hectolitres per ha.

• Deep soils of extremely worn granite.

• Vines of more than one hundred years old are pruned in the traditional style of low-trained Gobelet.

• The soil is worked with ploughing near to surface level 3 to 4 times a year.

• Harvests are picked by hand, using small crates which can hold up to 35 kilos. Sorting is done on a vibrating sorting table. Winemaking is done in vats using whole grape bunches, for a period of 12 to 15 days before pressing.

• Maturation is done in vats for a period of 10 months on fine lees, with micro-oxygenation.

 

Download the data sheet

*

Moulin-à-Vent

Héritage

Structure and richness

 

These very old vines were bequeathed to me by my grandfather and my father. It is my responsibility to care for them so that my heirs may also be lucky enough to make fine wines with them.
Today, this wine is a blend of the oldest vines of the domain in majority, in the localities named Les Greneriers and Les Burdelines.

 

• 100 % Gamay Noir with clear juice; yields of 20 to 30 hectolitres per hectare.

• Very worn granite soils, piedmont and ancient alluvium.

• In majority, the vines are 80 to 100 years old and pruned traditionally in the low-trained Gobelet style.

• The soil is worked by ploughing near to surface level 3 to 4 times a year.

• Harvests are picked by hand using small crates which can hold up to 35 kilos. Sorting is done on a vibrating sorting table. Winemaking, using whole grape bunches, is done keeping each plot in a separate vat for a period of 12 to 15 days before pressing.

• Wine from each plot is matured in separate vats for a period of 10 months on fine lees, with micro-oxygenation.

• Blending is done prior to bottling.

 

Download the data sheet

Beaujolais-Villages

 

Middle of the range wines of the area, the Beaujolais-Villages appellation covers the Northern half of the winegrowing area of 4 209 hectares of vines planted on steep slopes facing East-South-East, at altitudes of between 200 and 500 metres. 38 small towns and villages are concerned by this appellation, spread between the counties of the Rhône and the Saône-et-Loire.

Established in 1950, it is the first French appellation to bear the name “Villages”.

Soils lie directly upon hillsides, sometimes steep with up to 50% of slopes. Facing East-South-East, they are comprised of granite and sand or volcano-sedimentary soils.

Beaujolais-Villages provide a wonderful diversity of expression, ranging from the most full-bodied wines to the fruitiest.

 

*

Beaujolais-Villages Blanc

Argiles

Une étoffe sur du minéral

 

This wine is the result of my curiosity in 2008! I had uprooted a plot of Gamay of 0.63 of a hectare located in Romanèche-Thorins, in the locality named Les Jumeaux. I considered that these vines had no real advantage on this type of soil. I left the plot fallow for four years and then decided to plant Chardonnay, just for the pleasure of exploring something new.

 

• 100 % Chardonnay; yields of 30 to 45 hectolitres per hectare.

• Clayey-silty soils.

• These young vines are pruned in the simple Guyot style.

• Soils are worked, with ploughing done 3 or 4 times a year.

• Harvests picked by hand, using small crates which can hold up to 35 kilos.
• Sorting is done on a vibrating sorting table.
• Alcoholic fermentation in 228-litre barrels of more than 8 years.
• Malo-lactic fermentation is done depending on the vintage.

• Maturation is done in barrels on fine lees for a period of 10 to 11 months.

 

Download the data sheet

*

Beaujolais-Villages Rouge

Piémonts

Deliciousness with robustness

 

This wine has always been produced at our domain. It comes mainly from a blend of wines from a plot of old vines situated in Romanèche-Thorins, in two localities named Les Jumeaux and Les Peloux. I supplemented it in 2017with an addition of grapes from a magnificent terroir located in Salles-Arbuissonnas. These grapes were of such fine quality they deserved their place in my Piémonts wine.

 

• 100 % Gamay Noir with clear juice; yields of 35 to 45 hectolitres per hectare.

• Vines are 30 to 60 years old in majority, grown traditionally and pruned in low-trained Gobelet style.

• The wine comes from plots of old vines.

• Piedmont soils or ancient alluvium.

• Harvests handpicked using small crates which can hold up to 35 kilos.
• Sorting is done on a vibrating sorting table. Winemaking is done using whole bunches, keeping each plot in a separate vat, and lasts for a period of 10 to 12 days before pressing.

• Wine from each plot is matured in separate vats for a period of 7 to 10 months, on fine lees, with micro-oxygenation.

• Blending is done prior to bottling.

 

Download the data sheet

Brouilly

 

It is the southernmost of the winegrowing areas and the largest, covering 1 261 hectares. It extends from the foot of Mount Brouilly and Our Lady’s Chapel of grapes, at an altitude of 485 metres. It spreads over 6 small towns and villages: Cercié, Saint-Lager, Charentay, Odenas, Quincié and Saint-Étienne-la-Varenne. It takes its name from Brulius, a Roman officer who came to settle here after military campaigns.

Soils here are complex, with half of the area comprised of hillsides of very steep, pink-coloured granite rock and the other half divided between clayey scree called “blue stones”, ancient and often stony alluvium and small limestone hills. Brouilly wines possess minerality and delicious flavours.

 

& Chénas

 

This is the smallest appellation of the Beaujolais area, covering 249 hectares.

Its name comes from the French word “chêne” (meaning oak tree), there are so many are planted in this village. In ancient times, Gallo-Romans, and later monks, cleared woodland here in order to plant vines.

The winegrowing area is located to the West, on very steep, high granite slopes, whereas to the East, the landscape is less craggy with ancient alluvium mixed with layers of small pebbles.

The AOP (Protected Designation of Origin) came into existence in 1936. Neighbouring Moulin-à-Vent, it stretches into the counties of the Rhône and the Saône-et-Loire, with the village La Chapelle-de-Guinchay.
Chénas wines possess solid structure, as well as elegance.

 

*

Brouilly

Pleasure and vibrancy

 

As for the Chénas, I needed a special intuition about the vines’ potential. I felt it immediately with this plot of one hectare situated in the locality named Les Jacquets.

 

• 100 % Gamay Noir with clear juice; a yield of 50 hectolitres per hectare.

• Soils on very worn, deep granite.

• Old vines pruned in the Gobelet style on Beaujolais’ emblematic vine stock, the Viala.

• This plot of vines is cultivated according to Terra Vitis certification, for environmentally-friendly methods.

• Harvests are picked by hand using small crates which can hold up to 35 kilos. Sorting is done on a vibrating sorting table. Winemaking is done in vats using whole grape bunches, for a period of 12 to 15 days before pressing.

• Maturation is done in vats for a period of 10 months on fine lees, with micro-oxygenation.

 

Download the data sheet

*

Chénas

Character and suppleness

 

In 2017, for me it was not a matter of buying grapes just for buying grapes, but to establish a lasting bond with a winegrower for whose work I have great respect. I was absolutely taken with a plot in particular; one hectare situated in the locality named Les Blémonts. Everything about it charmed me: the luminosity, the grape bunches with air circulating freely around them, foliage high up. The potential was all there.

 

• 100 % Gamay Noir with clear juice; a yield of 44 hectolitres per hectare.

• Stony soil of ancient alluvium.

• Vines pruned in the trellised Gobelet style.

• Harvests picked by hand, using small crates which can hold up to 35 kilos. Sorting is done on a vibrating sorting table.

• Winemaking is done in vats using whole grape bunches, for a period of 12 to 15 days before pressing.

• Maturation is done in vats for a period of 7 to 10 months on fine lees, with micro-oxygenation.

 

Download the data sheet

The land of Beaujolais  •  A century of family history

Our impetus  •  The wines  •  Contact

 

 

Domaine Paul Janin & Fils

651 rue de la Chanillière

71570 Romanèche-Thorins

 

03 85 35 52 80

contact@domaine-paul-janin.fr

 

Wine-tasting by appointment from Monday to Saturday,

from 10. to 12. and from 14. to 18.

 

Excessive drinking is dangerous for the health.

alcoholic beverages should be consumed with moderation.

 

Credits – Legal notices

 

fr

en

fr

en

The land of Beaujolais
A century of family history

Our impetus
The wines
 Contact

 

 

Domaine Paul Janin & Fils

651 rue de la Chanillière

71570 Romanèche-Thorins

 

03 85 35 52 80

contact@domaine-paul-janin.fr

 

Wine-tasting by appointment from Monday to Saturday,

from 10. to 12. and from 14. to 18.

 

Excessive drinking is dangerous for the health.

alcoholic beverages should be consumed with moderation.

 

Credits – Legal notices